Goodbye, Zeta, Eta, and Theta.

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    This shows Hurricane Eta on November 9, 2020. (NOAA via AP)
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    This shows Eta on November 10, 2020. Do you see how the storm moved? (NOAA via AP)
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    A man looks at damage from Hurricane Eta in Honduras. (AP/Delmer Martinez)
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    People shelter under a bridge in Honduras. Their homes were damaged by hurricanes Eta and Iota. (AP/Delmer Martinez)
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    This is Hurricane Iota. Iota is another Greek letter. (NOAA via AP)
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Many hurricanes formed last year. Weather experts had a list of 21 names for them. They used every name. But more storms came.

The experts used Greek letters. Those confused people. No more Greek storm names.

Read More: Weather experts say that Greek letters had people wondering what they meant. Many look and sound alike (Zeta, Eta, Theta). People did not think so much about getting ready for a hurricane. The World Meteorological Association makes alphabetical lists of names each year. They are used for hurricanes (also called cyclones) in different parts of the world. Nahum 1:3 tells us, “The Lord is great in power. His way is in the whirlwind.”