He finds nest eggs.

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    A worker watches a mother turtle. He will make sure her eggs are safe. (Reuters/Eloisa Lopez)
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    The Cabagbag  family looks for nests in the sand. (Reuters/Eloisa Lopez)
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    Johnny Manlugay removes eggs from a nest. He will put them in a safe place. (Reuters/Eloisa Lopez)
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    Baby sea turtles leave their nest. (123RF)
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    A mother sea turtle left tracks in the sand. (123RF)
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THIS JUST IN

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Are there any turtle tracks?  Are there any nests? Mr. C. looks all over the beach. 

Mr. C. used to take eggs to eat.  Now he hunts for eggs to keep turtles safe. 

Pray: Thank God we can learn and change. God used people to teach Mr. C. how to care for turtles.

Read More: Jessie Cabagbag is a fisherman. He lives in the Philippines. He grew up eating turtle meat and eggs. A conservation program called CURMA taught him taking eggs is against the law. Turtles are endangered. CURMA trained Mr. Cabagbag. It pays him 20 pesos ($0.37) for each egg he finds. That’s four times more than what he would get selling an egg. Eggs are reburied in safe places so turtles can hatch. Mr. Cabagbag gets money to provide for his family. 

“Let the thief no longer steal, but rather let him labor.” (Ephesians 4:28)