How many storms do you see?

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    The Great Blue Hole is VERY big. (Andre Seale/VWPics via AP)
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    Divers explore the Great Blue Hole. (123RF)
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    Dean’s Blue Hole is one of the deepest. (Ton Engwirda/CC BY-SA 3.0 NL)
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    This is Watling’s Blue Hole. Would you like to see a blue hole in real life? (Mark Peter/James St. John/CC BY 2.0)
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    Scientists think that most blue holes used to be dry caves. They might have been like this limestone cave. (Rls at English Wikipedia/CC BY-SA 3.0)
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1-2-3.  Can you count storms with me? 

Blue holes are deep pits in the sea floor.  There are layers of sand at the bottom.  Each layer shows when a storm came!

Pray: We can explore blue holes. We find clues about history. Thank God that His world has so much to teach us!

Read More: Blue holes are made of limestone or coral reef. Hine’s Hole is in the western Bahamas. It is over 1,000 feet wide. Layers of sediment lie at the bottom. The layers are at least 200 feet thick! The layers are a record. They show over 2,000 years of hurricane history. There is no oxygen at that depth. No animals disturb the layers. The layers show there used to be many more hurricanes than there are now. God’s “eternal power” is shown in what He has made. (Romans 1:20)