Hungry worms hog the best dirt.

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    A jumping worm has a gray or white band around its body. (Susan Day/UW–Madison Arboretum via AP)
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    Jumping worms eat good soil. (Timothy McCay via AP)
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    A jumping worm is at the top of this photo. The worm under it is a common nightcrawler. (Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources via AP)
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    People find the worms all over. (Kaleigh Gale via AP)
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    Many plants and animals need the soil on top of the ground. Jumping worms eat it all. (Pixabay)
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They jump and wiggle.  They eat a lot.  They are not hungry kids.  They are jumping worms!

Jumping worms eat the top part of soil.  That takes food from other animals and plants.

Pray people will know how to stop jumping worms from doing harm. We need wisdom to take care of God’s world.  

Read More: Scientists think jumping worms came from Asia to America in the late 1800s. The worms may have hidden in potted plants. Their tiny eggs can spread when people move dirt or plants. Eggs stick to hiking shoes and drop in new places. Jumping worms eat the nutrient-rich top two inches of soil. Small dead animals, insects, and leaf litter are in that layer. Birds lose food. Plants lose good soil. May God help us protect all He has made. 

The Lord planted a garden for Adam “to work it and keep it.” (Genesis 2:15)