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Lizards learn to live in the city.

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    This crested anole lives in a city. (Kristin Winchell/New York University via AP)
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    This crested anole lives in a forest. (Jon G. Fuller / VWPics via AP Images)
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    San Juan is a big city in Puerto Rico. This is a neighborhood there. (AP Ricardo Arduengo)
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    Anoles have bright orange throat fans. These are called dewlaps. A lizard can fill its dewlap with air. It gets bigger. That can scare away enemies. (123RF)
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    A crested anole stands on a gate. (Kristin Winchell/New York University via AP)
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Some lizards moved from the forest to the city.  Walls are harder to climb than trees.  No problem!

The lizards changed over time.  Their babies grew new scales and longer legs.  Now walls are easy. 

Pray: Thank God for giving animals bodies that can change. Animals can adapt over time to live well in new places.

Read More: Many Puerto Rican crested anoles once lived in forests. Now many live in the capital city, San Juan. City lizards have scales that help them cling to smooth surfaces like windows and walls. Longer legs let them race over open spaces. Scientists studied 96 male crested anoles. Lizards with these helpful traits live longer. They pass them to their children. What do you think would happen over time if city lizards moved back to the forest? 

“O Lord, how manifold are your works! In wisdom have you made them all.” (Psalm 104:24)