Cruise down a Moon road.

  • 1 Moon road A single melt layer is about 1 8 cm deep
    Scientists burned crushed volcanic rock. It turned into smooth tiles. (Liquifer Systems Group)
  • 2 Moon road Laser used to melt moondust
    Hot laser beams burned the crushed volcanic rock. (Liquifer Systems Group)
  • 3 Moon road d41586 023 03207 y 26156346 jpg
    Burned rock is a better surface to drive on than Moon dust. (Liquifer Systems Group)
  • 4 Moon road Interlocking shapes to make paved surfaces
    The dry tiles can fit together to make Moon roads. (Liquifer Systems Group)
  • 1 Moon road A single melt layer is about 1 8 cm deep
  • 2 Moon road Laser used to melt moondust
  • 3 Moon road d41586 023 03207 y 26156346 jpg
  • 4 Moon road Interlocking shapes to make paved surfaces

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Do we need Moon roads?  Moon dust clogs and breaks rovers.  There is no wind to blow it away.

People want to use the Sun to burn smooth Moon roads.  Then rovers could travel better.

Pray people would have wisdom about how much they change the Moon.

Read More:
How do you make Moon roads? Give Moon dust a sunburn. Scientists took crushed volcanic rock that is like Moon dust. They heated it to over 2,900 degrees with a laser beam. They made triangle shapes with the burnt material. These could fit together to make roads on the Moon. It would take a lens over five feet wide and five feet long to burn Moon dust with sunlight. A foil lens could roll up to fit on a rocket. Read Dust off your space suit to learn more about Moon dust. 

“Praise Him, Sun and Moon! Praise Him, all you shining stars!” (Psalm 148:3)