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Why did the sheep cross the road?

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    Sheep cross the road. (KTVB-TV via AP)
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    People came to watch the sheep. (KTVB-TV via AP)
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    Boise National Forest is huge. This is just part of it. (Public domain)
  • 4 sheepforest
    Sheep graze in Boise National Forest. (Public domain)
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    These mountains are in part of the forest. (Public domain)
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  • 4 sheepforest
  • 5 sheepforest2

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Baa. Ding-a-ling. A sheep wearing a bell leads a mob down the road. Ranchers and dogs direct the sheep. Cars stay back to let them pass.

The grass really is greener on the other side!

Pray: Thank God for ranchers who lead sheep where they can eat and rest. God leads us to Himself. He is our rest.

Read More: About 2,500 sheep crossed an Idaho highway in April. A crowd of 300 people came to watch. Ranchers have taken sheep up to higher ground to graze for about 100 years. The sheep travel through the foothills. They spend the summer in the Boise National Forest. There they fatten up on fresh plants. This helps prevent fires. It boosts plant growth. Ranchers will herd the sheep back down in the fall.

David said God was like a shepherd to him. “He makes me lie down in green pastures.” (Psalm 23:2)